\[\begin{split}\newcommand{\as}{\kw{as}} \newcommand{\Assum}[3]{\kw{Assum}(#1)(#2:#3)} \newcommand{\case}{\kw{case}} \newcommand{\cons}{\textsf{cons}} \newcommand{\consf}{\textsf{consf}} \newcommand{\Def}[4]{\kw{Def}(#1)(#2:=#3:#4)} \newcommand{\emptyf}{\textsf{emptyf}} \newcommand{\End}{\kw{End}} \newcommand{\kwend}{\kw{end}} \newcommand{\even}{\textsf{even}} \newcommand{\evenO}{\textsf{even}_\textsf{O}} \newcommand{\evenS}{\textsf{even}_\textsf{S}} \newcommand{\Fix}{\kw{Fix}} \newcommand{\fix}{\kw{fix}} \newcommand{\for}{\textsf{for}} \newcommand{\forest}{\textsf{forest}} \newcommand{\Functor}{\kw{Functor}} \newcommand{\In}{\kw{in}} \newcommand{\Ind}[4]{\kw{Ind}[#2](#3:=#4)} \newcommand{\ind}[3]{\kw{Ind}~[#1]\left(#2\mathrm{~:=~}#3\right)} \newcommand{\Indp}[5]{\kw{Ind}_{#5}(#1)[#2](#3:=#4)} \newcommand{\Indpstr}[6]{\kw{Ind}_{#5}(#1)[#2](#3:=#4)/{#6}} \newcommand{\injective}{\kw{injective}} \newcommand{\kw}[1]{\textsf{#1}} \newcommand{\length}{\textsf{length}} \newcommand{\letin}[3]{\kw{let}~#1:=#2~\kw{in}~#3} \newcommand{\List}{\textsf{list}} \newcommand{\lra}{\longrightarrow} \newcommand{\Match}{\kw{match}} \newcommand{\Mod}[3]{{\kw{Mod}}({#1}:{#2}\,\zeroone{:={#3}})} \newcommand{\ModA}[2]{{\kw{ModA}}({#1}=={#2})} \newcommand{\ModS}[2]{{\kw{Mod}}({#1}:{#2})} \newcommand{\ModType}[2]{{\kw{ModType}}({#1}:={#2})} \newcommand{\mto}{.\;} \newcommand{\nat}{\textsf{nat}} \newcommand{\Nil}{\textsf{nil}} \newcommand{\nilhl}{\textsf{nil\_hl}} \newcommand{\nO}{\textsf{O}} \newcommand{\node}{\textsf{node}} \newcommand{\nS}{\textsf{S}} \newcommand{\odd}{\textsf{odd}} \newcommand{\oddS}{\textsf{odd}_\textsf{S}} \newcommand{\ovl}[1]{\overline{#1}} \newcommand{\Pair}{\textsf{pair}} \newcommand{\plus}{\mathsf{plus}} \newcommand{\SProp}{\textsf{SProp}} \newcommand{\Prop}{\textsf{Prop}} \newcommand{\return}{\kw{return}} \newcommand{\Set}{\textsf{Set}} \newcommand{\Sort}{\mathcal{S}} \newcommand{\Str}{\textsf{Stream}} \newcommand{\Struct}{\kw{Struct}} \newcommand{\subst}[3]{#1\{#2/#3\}} \newcommand{\tl}{\textsf{tl}} \newcommand{\tree}{\textsf{tree}} \newcommand{\trii}{\triangleright_\iota} \newcommand{\Type}{\textsf{Type}} \newcommand{\WEV}[3]{\mbox{$#1[] \vdash #2 \lra #3$}} \newcommand{\WEVT}[3]{\mbox{$#1[] \vdash #2 \lra$}\\ \mbox{$ #3$}} \newcommand{\WF}[2]{{\mathcal{W\!F}}(#1)[#2]} \newcommand{\WFE}[1]{\WF{E}{#1}} \newcommand{\WFT}[2]{#1[] \vdash {\mathcal{W\!F}}(#2)} \newcommand{\WFTWOLINES}[2]{{\mathcal{W\!F}}\begin{array}{l}(#1)\\\mbox{}[{#2}]\end{array}} \newcommand{\with}{\kw{with}} \newcommand{\WS}[3]{#1[] \vdash #2 <: #3} \newcommand{\WSE}[2]{\WS{E}{#1}{#2}} \newcommand{\WT}[4]{#1[#2] \vdash #3 : #4} \newcommand{\WTE}[3]{\WT{E}{#1}{#2}{#3}} \newcommand{\WTEG}[2]{\WTE{\Gamma}{#1}{#2}} \newcommand{\WTM}[3]{\WT{#1}{}{#2}{#3}} \newcommand{\zeroone}[1]{[{#1}]} \end{split}\]

The Module System

The module system extends the Calculus of Inductive Constructions providing a convenient way to structure large developments as well as a means of massive abstraction.

Modules and module types

Access path. An access path is denoted by \(p\) and can be either a module variable \(X\) or, if \(p′\) is an access path and \(id\) an identifier, then \(p′.id\) is an access path.

Structure element. A structure element is denoted by \(e\) and is either a definition of a constant, an assumption, a definition of an inductive, a definition of a module, an alias of a module or a module type abbreviation.

Structure expression. A structure expression is denoted by \(S\) and can be:

  • an access path \(p\)

  • a plain structure \(\Struct~e ; … ; e~\End\)

  • a functor \(\Functor(X:S)~S′\), where \(X\) is a module variable, \(S\) and \(S′\) are structure expressions

  • an application \(S~p\), where \(S\) is a structure expression and \(p\) an access path

  • a refined structure \(S~\with~p := p\)′ or \(S~\with~p := t:T\) where \(S\) is a structure expression, \(p\) and \(p′\) are access paths, \(t\) is a term and \(T\) is the type of \(t\).

Module definition. A module definition is written \(\Mod{X}{S}{S'}\) and consists of a module variable \(X\), a module type \(S\) which can be any structure expression and optionally a module implementation \(S′\) which can be any structure expression except a refined structure.

Module alias. A module alias is written \(\ModA{X}{p}\) and consists of a module variable \(X\) and a module path \(p\).

Module type abbreviation. A module type abbreviation is written \(\ModType{Y}{S}\), where \(Y\) is an identifier and \(S\) is any structure expression .

Using modules

The module system provides a way of packaging related elements together, as well as a means of massive abstraction.

Command Module ImportExport? ident module_binder* of_module_type? := module_expr_inl+<+?
module_binder::=( ImportExport? ident+ : module_type_inl )module_type_inl::=! module_type|module_type functor_app_annot?functor_app_annot::=[ inline at level natural ]|[ no inline ]module_type::=qualid|( module_type )|module_type module_expr_atom|module_type with with_declarationwith_declaration::=Definition qualid univ_decl? := term|Module qualid := qualidmodule_expr_atom::=qualid|( module_expr_atom+ )of_module_type::=: module_type_inl|<: module_type_inl*module_expr_inl::=! module_expr_atom+|module_expr_atom+ functor_app_annot?

Defines a module named ident. See the examples here.

The Import and Export flags specify whether the module should be automatically imported or exported.

Specifying module_binder* starts a functor with parameters given by the module_binders. (A functor is a function from modules to modules.)

of_module_type specifies the module type. <: module_type_inl+ starts a module that satisfies each module_type_inl.

:= module_expr_inl+<+ specifies the body of a module or functor definition. If it's not specified, then the module is defined interactively, meaning that the module is defined as a series of commands terminated with End instead of in a single Module command. Interactively defining the module_expr_inls in a series of Include commands is equivalent to giving them all in a single non-interactive Module command.

The ! prefix indicates that any assumption command (such as Axiom) with an Inline clause in the type of the functor arguments will be ignored.

Command Module Type ident module_binder* <: module_type_inl* := module_type_inl+<+?

Defines a module type named ident. See the example here.

Specifying module_binder* starts a functor type with parameters given by the module_binders.

:= module_type_inl+<+ specifies the body of a module or functor type definition. If it's not specified, then the module type is defined interactively, meaning that the module type is defined as a series of commands terminated with End instead of in a single Module Type command. Interactively defining the module_type_inls in a series of Include commands is equivalent to giving them all in a single non-interactive Module Type command.

Terminating an interactive module or module type definition

Interactive modules are terminated with the End command, which is also used to terminate Sections. End ident closes the interactive module or module type ident. If the module type was given, the command verifies that the content of the module matches the module type. If the module is not a functor, its components (constants, inductive types, submodules etc.) are now available through the dot notation.

Error No such label ident.
Error Signature components for label ident do not match.
Error The field ident is missing in qualid.

Note

  1. Interactive modules and module types can be nested.

  2. Interactive modules and module types can't be defined inside of sections. Sections can be defined inside of interactive modules and module types.

  3. Hints and notations (the Hint and Notation commands) can also appear inside interactive modules and module types. Note that with module definitions like:

    Module ident1 : module_type := ident2.

    or

    Module ident1 : module_type.
    Include ident2.
    End ident1.

    hints and the like valid for ident1 are the ones defined in module_type rather then those defined in ident2 (or the module body).

  4. Within an interactive module type definition, the Parameter command declares a constant instead of definining a new axiom (which it does when not in a module type definition).

  5. Assumptions such as Axiom that include the Inline clause will be automatically expanded when the functor is applied, except when the function application is prefixed by !.

Command Include module_type_inl <+ module_expr_inl*

Includes the content of module(s) in the current interactive module. Here module_type_inl can be a module expression or a module type expression. If it is a high-order module or module type expression then the system tries to instantiate module_type_inl with the current interactive module.

Including multiple modules is a single Include is equivalent to including each module in a separate Include command.

Command Include Type module_type_inl+<+

Deprecated since version 8.3: Use Include instead.

Command Declare Module ImportExport? ident module_binder* : module_type_inl

Declares a module ident of type module_type_inl.

If module_binders are specified, declares a functor with parameters given by the list of module_binders.

Command Import filtered_import+
filtered_import::=qualid ( qualid ( .. )?+, )?

If qualid denotes a valid basic module (i.e. its module type is a signature), makes its components available by their short names.

Example

Module Mod.
Interactive Module Mod started
Definition T:=nat.
T is defined
Check T.
T : Set
End Mod.
Module Mod is defined
Check Mod.T.
Mod.T : Set
Fail Check T.
The command has indeed failed with message: The reference T was not found in the current environment.
Import Mod.
Check T.
T : Set

Some features defined in modules are activated only when a module is imported. This is for instance the case of notations (see Notations).

Declarations made with the local attribute are never imported by the Import command. Such declarations are only accessible through their fully qualified name.

Example

Module A.
Interactive Module A started
Module B.
Interactive Module B started
Local Definition T := nat.
T is defined
End B.
Module B is defined
End A.
Module A is defined
Import A.
Check B.T.
Toplevel input, characters 6-9: > Check B.T. > ^^^ Error: The reference B.T was not found in the current environment.

Appending a module name with a parenthesized list of names will make only those names available with short names, not other names defined in the module nor will it activate other features.

The names to import may be constants, inductive types and constructors, and notation aliases (for instance, Ltac definitions cannot be selectively imported). If they are from an inner module to the one being imported, they must be prefixed by the inner path.

The name of an inductive type may also be followed by (..) to import it, its constructors and its eliminators if they exist. For this purpose "eliminator" means a constant in the same module whose name is the inductive type's name suffixed by one of _sind, _ind, _rec or _rect.

Example

Module A.
Interactive Module A started
Module B.
Interactive Module B started
Inductive T := C.
T is defined T_rect is defined T_ind is defined T_rec is defined T_sind is defined
Definition U := nat.
U is defined
End B.
Module B is defined
Definition Z := Prop.
Z is defined
End A.
Module A is defined
Import A(B.T(..), Z).
Check B.T.
B.T : Prop
Check B.C.
B.C : B.T
Check Z.
Z : Type
Fail Check B.U.
The command has indeed failed with message: The reference B.U was not found in the current environment.
Check A.B.U.
A.B.U : Set
Command Export filtered_import+

Similar to Import, except that when the module containing this command is imported, the qualid+ are imported as well.

The selective import syntax also works with Export.

Error qualid is not a module.
Warning Trying to mask the absolute name qualid!
Command Print Module qualid

Prints the module type and (optionally) the body of the module qualid.

Command Print Module Type qualid

Prints the module type corresponding to qualid.

Flag Short Module Printing

This flag (off by default) disables the printing of the types of fields, leaving only their names, for the commands Print Module and Print Module Type.

Examples

Example: Defining a simple module interactively

Module M.
Interactive Module M started
Definition T := nat.
T is defined
Definition x := 0.
x is defined
Definition y : bool.
1 goal ============================ bool
exact true.
No more goals.
Defined.
End M.
Module M is defined

Inside a module one can define constants, prove theorems and do anything else that can be done in the toplevel. Components of a closed module can be accessed using the dot notation:

Print M.x.
M.x = 0 : nat

Example: Defining a simple module type interactively

Module Type SIG.
Interactive Module Type SIG started
Parameter T : Set.
T is declared
Parameter x : T.
x is declared
End SIG.
Module Type SIG is defined

Example: Creating a new module that omits some items from an existing module

Since SIG, the type of the new module N, doesn't define y or give the body of x, which are not included in N.

Module N : SIG with Definition T := nat := M.
Module N is defined
Print N.T.
N.T = nat : Set
Print N.x.
*** [ N.x : N.T ]
Fail Print N.y.
The command has indeed failed with message: N.y not a defined object.
Module M.
Interactive Module M started
Definition T := nat.
T is defined
Definition x := 0.
x is defined
Definition y : bool.
1 goal ============================ bool
exact true.
No more goals.
Defined.
End M.
Module M is defined
Module Type SIG.
Interactive Module Type SIG started
Parameter T : Set.
T is declared
Parameter x : T.
x is declared
End SIG.
Module Type SIG is defined

The definition of N using the module type expression SIG with Definition T := nat is equivalent to the following one:

Module Type SIG'.
Interactive Module Type SIG' started
Definition T : Set := nat.
T is defined
Parameter x : T.
x is declared
End SIG'.
Module Type SIG' is defined
Module N : SIG' := M.
Module N is defined

If we just want to be sure that our implementation satisfies a given module type without restricting the interface, we can use a transparent constraint

Module P <: SIG := M.
Module P is defined
Print P.y.
P.y = true : bool

Example: Creating a functor (a module with parameters)

Module Two (X Y: SIG).
Interactive Module Two started
Definition T := (X.T * Y.T)%type.
T is defined
Definition x := (X.x, Y.x).
x is defined
End Two.
Module Two is defined

and apply it to our modules and do some computations:

Module Q := Two M N.
Module Q is defined
Eval compute in (fst Q.x + snd Q.x).
= N.x : nat

Example: A module type with two sub-modules, sharing some fields

Module Type SIG2.
Interactive Module Type SIG2 started
  Declare Module M1 : SIG.
Module M1 is declared
  Module M2 <: SIG.
Interactive Module M2 started
    Definition T := M1.T.
T is defined
    Parameter x : T.
x is declared
  End M2.
Module M2 is defined
End SIG2.
Module Type SIG2 is defined
Module Mod <: SIG2.
Interactive Module Mod started
  Module M1.
Interactive Module M1 started
    Definition T := nat.
T is defined
    Definition x := 1.
x is defined
  End M1.
Module M1 is defined
Module M2 := M.
Module M2 is defined
End Mod.
Module Mod is defined

Notice that M is a correct body for the component M2 since its T component is nat as specified for M1.T.

Typing Modules

In order to introduce the typing system we first slightly extend the syntactic class of terms and environments given in section The terms. The environments, apart from definitions of constants and inductive types now also hold any other structure elements. Terms, apart from variables, constants and complex terms, also include access paths.

We also need additional typing judgments:

  • \(\WFT{E}{S}\), denoting that a structure \(S\) is well-formed,

  • \(\WTM{E}{p}{S}\), denoting that the module pointed by \(p\) has type \(S\) in the global environment \(E\).

  • \(\WEV{E}{S}{\ovl{S}}\), denoting that a structure \(S\) is evaluated to a structure \(S\) in weak head normal form.

  • \(\WS{E}{S_1}{S_2}\) , denoting that a structure \(S_1\) is a subtype of a structure \(S_2\).

  • \(\WS{E}{e_1}{e_2}\) , denoting that a structure element e_1 is more precise than a structure element e_2.

The rules for forming structures are the following:

WF-STR
\[\frac{% \WF{E;E′}{}% }{% \WFT{E}{ \Struct~E′ ~\End}% }\]
WF-FUN
\[\frac{% \WFT{E; \ModS{X}{S}}{ \ovl{S′} }% }{% \WFT{E}{ \Functor(X:S)~S′}% }\]

Evaluation of structures to weak head normal form:

WEVAL-APP
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S}{\Functor(X:S_1 )~S_2}~~~~~\WEV{E}{S_1}{\ovl{S_1}} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WTM{E}{p}{S_3}~~~~~ \WS{E}{S_3}{\ovl{S_1}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \WEV{E}{S~p}{S_2 \{p/X,t_1 /p_1 .c_1 ,…,t_n /p_n.c_n \}}% }\end{split}\]

In the last rule, \(\{t_1 /p_1 .c_1 ,…,t_n /p_n .c_n \}\) is the resulting substitution from the inlining mechanism. We substitute in \(S\) the inlined fields \(p_i .c_i\) from \(\ModS{X}{S_1 }\) by the corresponding delta- reduced term \(t_i\) in \(p\).

WEVAL-WITH-MOD
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ S \lra \Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModS{X}{S_1 };e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n ~\End \\% \hspace{3em}% E;e_1 ;…;e_i [] ⊢ S_1 \lra \ovl{S_1} ~~~~~~% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ p : S_2 \\% \hspace{3em}% E;e_1 ;…;e_i [] ⊢ S_2 <: \ovl{S_1}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S~\with~x := p}{}\\% \hspace{3em}% \Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModA{X}{p};e_{i+2} \{p/X\} ;…;e_n \{p/X\} ~\End% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-WITH-MOD-REC
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S}{\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModS{X_1}{S_1 };e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n ~\End} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E;e_1 ;…;e_i }{S_1~\with~p := p_1}{\ovl{S_2}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S~\with~X_1.p := p_1}{} \\% \hspace{3em}% \Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModS{X}{\ovl{S_2}};e_{i+2} \{p_1 /X_1.p\} ;…;e_n \{p_1 /X_1.p\} ~\End% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-WITH-DEF
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S}{\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;\Assum{}{c}{T_1};e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n ~\End} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WS{E;e_1 ;…;e_i }{Def()(c:=t:T)}{\Assum{}{c}{T_1}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S~\with~c := t:T}{} \\% \hspace{3em}% \Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;Def()(c:=t:T);e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n ~\End% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-WITH-DEF-REC
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S}{\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModS{X_1 }{S_1 };e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n ~\End} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E;e_1 ;…;e_i }{S_1~\with~p := p_1}{\ovl{S_2}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S~\with~X_1.p := t:T}{} \\% \hspace{3em}% \Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModS{X}{\ovl{S_2} };e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n ~\End% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-PATH-MOD1
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{p}{\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \Mod{X}{S}{S_1};e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n End} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E;e_1 ;…;e_i }{S}{\ovl{S}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% E[] ⊢ p.X \lra \ovl{S}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-PATH-MOD2
\[\frac{% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% \Mod{X}{S}{S_1}∈ E% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S}{\ovl{S}}% }{% \WEV{E}{X}{\ovl{S}}% }\]
WEVAL-PATH-ALIAS1
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{p}{~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModA{X}{p_1};e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n End} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E;e_1 ;…;e_i }{p_1}{\ovl{S}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \WEV{E}{p.X}{\ovl{S}}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-PATH-ALIAS2
\[\frac{% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% \ModA{X}{p_1 }∈ E% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{p_1}{\ovl{S}}% }{% \WEV{E}{X}{\ovl{S}}% }\]
WEVAL-PATH-TYPE1
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{p}{~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \ModType{Y}{S};e_{i+2} ;… ;e_n End} \\% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E;e_1 ;…;e_i }{S}{\ovl{S}}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \WEV{E}{p.Y}{\ovl{S}}% }\end{split}\]
WEVAL-PATH-TYPE2
\[\frac{% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% \ModType{Y}{S}∈ E% \hspace{3em}% \WEV{E}{S}{\ovl{S}}% }{% \WEV{E}{Y}{\ovl{S}}% }\]

Rules for typing module:

MT-EVAL
\[\frac{% \WEV{E}{p}{\ovl{S}}% }{% E[] ⊢ p : \ovl{S}% }\]
MT-STR
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ p : S% }{% E[] ⊢ p : S/p% }\]

The last rule, called strengthening is used to make all module fields manifestly equal to themselves. The notation \(S/p\) has the following meaning:

  • if \(S\lra~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_n ~\End\) then \(S/p=~\Struct~e_1 /p;…;e_n /p ~\End\) where \(e/p\) is defined as follows (note that opaque definitions are processed as assumptions):

    • \(\Def{}{c}{t}{T}/p = \Def{}{c}{t}{T}\)

    • \(\Assum{}{c}{U}/p = \Def{}{c}{p.c}{U}\)

    • \(\ModS{X}{S}/p = \ModA{X}{p.X}\)

    • \(\ModA{X}{p′}/p = \ModA{X}{p′}\)

    • \(\Ind{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}/p = \Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p}\)

    • \(\Indpstr{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p'}{p} = \Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p'}\)

  • if \(S \lra \Functor(X:S′)~S″\) then \(S/p=S\)

The notation \(\Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p}\) denotes an inductive definition that is definitionally equal to the inductive definition in the module denoted by the path \(p\). All rules which have \(\Ind{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}\) as premises are also valid for \(\Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p}\). We give the formation rule for \(\Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p}\) below as well as the equality rules on inductive types and constructors.

The module subtyping rules:

MSUB-STR
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WS{E;e_1 ;…;e_n }{e_{σ(i)}}{e'_i ~\for~ i=1..m} \\% \hspace{3em}% σ : \{1… m\} → \{1… n\} ~\injective% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \WS{E}{\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_n ~\End}{~\Struct~e'_1 ;…;e'_m ~\End}% }\end{split}\]
MSUB-FUN
\[\frac{% \WS{E}{\ovl{S_1'}}{\ovl{S_1}}% \hspace{3em}% \WS{E; \ModS{X}{S_1'}}{\ovl{S_2}}{\ovl{S_2'}}% }{% E[] ⊢ \Functor(X:S_1 ) S_2 <: \Functor(X:S_1') S_2'% }\]

Structure element subtyping rules:

ASSUM-ASSUM
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ T_1 ≤_{βδιζη} T_2% }{% \WS{E}{\Assum{}{c}{T_1 }}{\Assum{}{c}{T_2 }}% }\]
DEF-ASSUM
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ T_1 ≤_{βδιζη} T_2% }{% \WS{E}{\Def{}{c}{t}{T_1 }}{\Assum{}{c}{T_2 }}% }\]
ASSUM-DEF
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ T_1 ≤_{βδιζη} T_2% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ c =_{βδιζη} t_2% }{% \WS{E}{\Assum{}{c}{T_1 }}{\Def{}{c}{t_2 }{T_2 }}% }\]
DEF-DEF
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ T_1 ≤_{βδιζη} T_2% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ t_1 =_{βδιζη} t_2% }{% \WS{E}{\Def{}{c}{t_1 }{T_1 }}{\Def{}{c}{t_2 }{T_2 }}% }\]
IND-IND
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ Γ_P =_{βδιζη} Γ_P'% \hspace{3em}% E[Γ_P ] ⊢ Γ_C =_{βδιζη} Γ_C'% \hspace{3em}% E[Γ_P ;Γ_C ] ⊢ Γ_I =_{βδιζη} Γ_I'% }{% \WS{E}{\ind{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}}{\ind{Γ_P'}{Γ_C'}{Γ_I'}}% }\]
INDP-IND
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ Γ_P =_{βδιζη} Γ_P'% \hspace{3em}% E[Γ_P ] ⊢ Γ_C =_{βδιζη} Γ_C'% \hspace{3em}% E[Γ_P ;Γ_C ] ⊢ Γ_I =_{βδιζη} Γ_I'% }{% \WS{E}{\Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p}}{\ind{Γ_P'}{Γ_C'}{Γ_I'}}% }\]
INDP-INDP
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ Γ_P =_{βδιζη} Γ_P'% \hspace{3em}% E[Γ_P ] ⊢ Γ_C =_{βδιζη} Γ_C' \\% \hspace{3em}% E[Γ_P ;Γ_C ] ⊢ Γ_I =_{βδιζη} Γ_I'% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ p =_{βδιζη} p'% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \WS{E}{\Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p}}{\Indp{}{Γ_P'}{Γ_C'}{Γ_I'}{p'}}% }\end{split}\]
MOD-MOD
\[\frac{% \WS{E}{S_1}{S_2}% }{% \WS{E}{\ModS{X}{S_1 }}{\ModS{X}{S_2 }}% }\]
ALIAS-MOD
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ p : S_1% \hspace{3em}% \WS{E}{S_1}{S_2}% }{% \WS{E}{\ModA{X}{p}}{\ModS{X}{S_2 }}% }\]
MOD-ALIAS
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ p : S_2% \hspace{3em}% \WS{E}{S_1}{S_2}% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ X =_{βδιζη} p% }{% \WS{E}{\ModS{X}{S_1 }}{\ModA{X}{p}}% }\]
ALIAS-ALIAS
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ p_1 =_{βδιζη} p_2% }{% \WS{E}{\ModA{X}{p_1 }}{\ModA{X}{p_2 }}% }\]
MODTYPE-MODTYPE
\[\frac{% \WS{E}{S_1}{S_2}% \hspace{3em}% \WS{E}{S_2}{S_1}% }{% \WS{E}{\ModType{Y}{S_1 }}{\ModType{Y}{S_2 }}% }\]

New environment formation rules

WF-MOD1
\[\frac{% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% \WFT{E}{S}% }{% WF(E; \ModS{X}{S})[]% }\]
WF-MOD2
\[\frac{% \WS{E}{S_2}{S_1}% \hspace{3em}% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% \WFT{E}{S_1}% \hspace{3em}% \WFT{E}{S_2}% }{% \WF{E; \Mod{X}{S_1}{S_2}}{}% }\]
WF-ALIAS
\[\frac{% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ p : S% }{% \WF{E, \ModA{X}{p}}{}% }\]
WF-MODTYPE
\[\frac{% \WF{E}{}% \hspace{3em}% \WFT{E}{S}% }{% \WF{E, \ModType{Y}{S}}{}% }\]
WF-IND
\[\begin{split}\frac{% \begin{array}{c}% \hspace{3em}% \WF{E;\ind{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}}{} \\% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ p:~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_n ;\ind{Γ_P'}{Γ_C'}{Γ_I'};… ~\End : \\% \hspace{3em}% E[] ⊢ \ind{Γ_P'}{Γ_C'}{Γ_I'} <: \ind{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}% \hspace{3em}% \end{array}% }{% \WF{E; \Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p} }{}% }\end{split}\]

Component access rules

ACC-TYPE1
\[\frac{% E[Γ] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;\Assum{}{c}{T};… ~\End% }{% E[Γ] ⊢ p.c : T% }\]
ACC-TYPE2
\[\frac{% E[Γ] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;\Def{}{c}{t}{T};… ~\End% }{% E[Γ] ⊢ p.c : T% }\]

Notice that the following rule extends the delta rule defined in section Conversion rules

ACC-DELTA
\[\frac{% E[Γ] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;\Def{}{c}{t}{U};… ~\End% }{% E[Γ] ⊢ p.c \triangleright_δ t% }\]

In the rules below we assume \(Γ_P\) is \([p_1 :P_1 ;…;p_r :P_r ]\), \(Γ_I\) is \([I_1 :A_1 ;…;I_k :A_k ]\), and \(Γ_C\) is \([c_1 :C_1 ;…;c_n :C_n ]\).

ACC-IND1
\[\frac{% E[Γ] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;\ind{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I};… ~\End% }{% E[Γ] ⊢ p.I_j : (p_1 :P_1 )…(p_r :P_r )A_j% }\]
ACC-IND2
\[\frac{% E[Γ] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ;\ind{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I};… ~\End% }{% E[Γ] ⊢ p.c_m : (p_1 :P_1 )…(p_r :P_r )C_m I_j (I_j~p_1 …p_r )_{j=1… k}% }\]
ACC-INDP1
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p'} ;… ~\End% }{% E[] ⊢ p.I_i \triangleright_δ p'.I_i% }\]
ACC-INDP2
\[\frac{% E[] ⊢ p :~\Struct~e_1 ;…;e_i ; \Indp{}{Γ_P}{Γ_C}{Γ_I}{p'} ;… ~\End% }{% E[] ⊢ p.c_i \triangleright_δ p'.c_i% }\]

Libraries and qualified names

Names of libraries

The theories developed in Coq are stored in library files which are hierarchically classified into libraries and sublibraries. To express this hierarchy, library names are represented by qualified identifiers qualid, i.e. as list of identifiers separated by dots (see Qualified identifiers). For instance, the library file Mult of the standard Coq library Arith is named Coq.Arith.Mult. The identifier that starts the name of a library is called a library root. All library files of the standard library of Coq have the reserved root Coq but library filenames based on other roots can be obtained by using Coq commands (coqc, coqtop, coqdep, …) options -Q or -R (see By command line options). Also, when an interactive Coq session starts, a library of root Top is started, unless option -top or -notop is set (see By command line options).

Qualified identifiers

qualid::=ident field_ident*field_ident::=.ident

Library files are modules which possibly contain submodules which eventually contain constructions (axioms, parameters, definitions, lemmas, theorems, remarks or facts). The absolute name, or full name, of a construction in some library file is a qualified identifier starting with the logical name of the library file, followed by the sequence of submodules names encapsulating the construction and ended by the proper name of the construction. Typically, the absolute name Coq.Init.Logic.eq denotes Leibniz’ equality defined in the module Logic in the sublibrary Init of the standard library of Coq.

The proper name that ends the name of a construction is the short name (or sometimes base name) of the construction (for instance, the short name of Coq.Init.Logic.eq is eq). Any partial suffix of the absolute name is a partially qualified name (e.g. Logic.eq is a partially qualified name for Coq.Init.Logic.eq). Especially, the short name of a construction is its shortest partially qualified name.

Coq does not accept two constructions (definition, theorem, …) with the same absolute name but different constructions can have the same short name (or even same partially qualified names as soon as the full names are different).

Notice that the notion of absolute, partially qualified and short names also applies to library filenames.

Visibility

Coq maintains a table called the name table which maps partially qualified names of constructions to absolute names. This table is updated by the commands Require, Import and Export and also each time a new declaration is added to the context. An absolute name is called visible from a given short or partially qualified name when this latter name is enough to denote it. This means that the short or partially qualified name is mapped to the absolute name in Coq name table. Definitions with the local attribute are only accessible with their fully qualified name (see Top-level definitions).

It may happen that a visible name is hidden by the short name or a qualified name of another construction. In this case, the name that has been hidden must be referred to using one more level of qualification. To ensure that a construction always remains accessible, absolute names can never be hidden.

Example

Check 0.
0 : nat
Definition nat := bool.
nat is defined
Check 0.
0 : Datatypes.nat
Check Datatypes.nat.
Datatypes.nat : Set
Locate nat.
Constant Top.nat Inductive Coq.Init.Datatypes.nat (shorter name to refer to it in current context is Datatypes.nat)

See also

Commands Locate.

Libraries and filesystem

Note

The questions described here have been subject to redesign in Coq 8.5. Former versions of Coq use the same terminology to describe slightly different things.

Compiled files (.vo and .vio) store sub-libraries. In order to refer to them inside Coq, a translation from file-system names to Coq names is needed. In this translation, names in the file system are called physical paths while Coq names are contrastingly called logical names.

A logical prefix Lib can be associated with a physical path using the command line option -Q path Lib. All subfolders of path are recursively associated with the logical path Lib extended with the corresponding suffix coming from the physical path. For instance, the folder path/foo/Bar maps to Lib.foo.Bar. Subdirectories corresponding to invalid Coq identifiers are skipped, and, by convention, subdirectories named CVS or _darcs are skipped too.

Thanks to this mechanism, .vo files are made available through the logical name of the folder they are in, extended with their own basename. For example, the name associated with the file path/foo/Bar/File.vo is Lib.foo.Bar.File. The same caveat applies for invalid identifiers. When compiling a source file, the .vo file stores its logical name, so that an error is issued if it is loaded with the wrong loadpath afterwards.

Some folders have a special status and are automatically put in the path. Coq commands automatically associate a logical path to files in the repository tree rooted at the directory from where the command is launched, coqlib/user-contrib/, the directories listed in the $COQPATH, ${XDG_DATA_HOME}/coq/ and ${XDG_DATA_DIRS}/coq/ environment variables (see XDG base directory specification) with the same physical-to-logical translation and with an empty logical prefix.

The command line option -R is a variant of -Q which has the strictly same behavior regarding loadpaths, but which also makes the corresponding .vo files available through their short names in a way similar to the Import command. For instance, -R path Lib associates the file /path/foo/Bar/File.vo with the logical name Lib.foo.Bar.File but allows this file to be accessed through the short names foo.Bar.File, Bar.File and File. If several files with identical base name are present in different subdirectories of a recursive loadpath, which of these files is found first may be system- dependent and explicit qualification is recommended. The From argument of the Require command can be used to bypass the implicit shortening by providing an absolute root to the required file (see Compiled files).

There also exists another independent loadpath mechanism attached to OCaml object files (.cmo or .cmxs) rather than Coq object files as described above. The OCaml loadpath is managed using the option -I path (in the OCaml world, there is neither a notion of logical name prefix nor a way to access files in subdirectories of path). See the command Declare ML Module in Compiled files to understand the need of the OCaml loadpath.

See By command line options for a more general view over the Coq command line options.

Controlling the scope of commands with locality attributes

Many commands have effects that apply only within a specific scope, typically the section or the module in which the command was called. Locality attributes can alter the scope of the effect. Below, we give the semantics of each locality attribute while noting a few exceptional commands for which local and global attributes are interpreted differently.

Attribute local

The local attribute limits the effect of the command to the current scope (section or module).

The Local prefix is an alternative syntax for the local attribute (see legacy_attr).

Note

  • For some commands, this is the only locality supported within sections (e.g., for Notation, Ltac and Hint commands).

  • For some commands, this is the default locality within sections even though other locality attributes are supported as well (e.g., for the Arguments command).

Warning

Exception: when local is applied to Definition, Theorem or their variants, its semantics are different: it makes the defined objects available only through their fully-qualified names rather than their unqualified names after an Import.

Attribute export

The export attribute makes the effect of the command persist when the section is closed and applies the effect when the module containing the command is imported.

Commands supporting this attribute include Set, Unset and the Hint commands, although the latter don't support it within sections.

Attribute global

The global attribute makes the effect of the command persist even when the current section or module is closed. Loading the file containing the command (possibly transitively) applies the effect of the command.

The Global prefix is an alternative syntax for the global attribute (see legacy_attr).

Warning

Exception: for a few commands (like Notation and Ltac), this attribute behaves like export.

Warning

We strongly discourage using the global locality attribute because the transitive nature of file loading gives the user little control. We recommend using the export locality attribute where it is supported.